The Betrayal, Panaghia Chrysafitissa, Byzantine, 1289AD.


Fig. 39. The Betrayal, Church of Panaghia Chrysafitissa, in Krysafa, Laconia, 13th c., authorís photo

Fig. 40. The Betrayal, Church of Panaghia Chrysafitissa, in Krysafa, Laconia, 13th c., detail of the Chiliarchos, authorís photo

Fig. 41. The Betrayal, Church of Panaghia Chrysafitissa, in Krysafa, Laconia, 13th c., detail of the Chiliarchos, authorís photo

Fig. 42. The Betrayal, Church of Panaghia Chrysafitissa, in Krysafa, Laconia, 13th c., detail, authorís photo

In the Church of the Panaghia Chrisafitissa, in Chrisafa, Laconia, also dated to 1289 AD, the details of the military costume are magnificent (Fig. 39). One of the officers (Fig. 40, maybe the Chiliarchos) wears a bonnet in the Western style (Fig. 41), and this is probably one of the first representations of the new elite regiments of the fleet of Michael VIII, the Gasmouloi, who were conducting military operations in Laconia some decades before the completion of the frescoes.64
    Again shields covered with pearls are represented (Fig. 42), maybe symbols of the Imperial Guardsmen or elite troops.
    After 1204 and the temporary conquest of Constantinople by the Crusaders many frescoes of the Betrayal show the scene as a full scale military operation with the warriors clad in full armours and fighting gear.65 The analysis further conducted on the frescoes representing the Betrayal in the 13th century show fully armoured soldiers representing local troops or specific regiments. A strong influence of Western armament and equipment on Roman arms and armours begins to be seen. The artists, though Saint Peter and Jesus Christ are represented as stereotypes, always differentiate the mob, the officers and the soldiers. The latter are copied from the reality of their age, and also weapons and equipment, as well as clothing, are copied in realistic details. Finally, last but not least, the evolution of the weapons employed at the time of the frescoes is well documented by the paintings.

pp85-87, Raffaele d'Amato The Betrayal: Military Iconography and Archaeology In The Byzantine Paintings Of The 11th-15th C. AD Representing The Arrest Of Our Lord



See also Varangian Guard(?) in The Betrayal, Mural in Aghios Georgios, Missolourgaki, Crete, 1401AD.
Other Byzantine Illustrations of Costume & Soldiers
13th Century Illustrations of Costume & Soldiers






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